I am Kenneth Reitz. Ask me anything.

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Ryan Mendes's photo

Hi Kenneth,

Nice to see you here!

  • What sort of work do you do at Heroku?
  • What are some of your productivity hacks?
  • Why did you create requests library and how did you come up with the idea?
Kenneth Reitz's photo

Software for Humans

Hello!

I call myself the "Python Overlord" at Heroku. Effectively, there is a team of "language owners" — one for each major language that Heroku, as a platform, officially supports. I am the Language Owner of Python. This includes wearing many hats, from software engineering, to community engagement and support, to customer engagement and support, to marketing, etc.

Productivity hacks? Well, I love Things.app—I've been using it for at least 6 years. About once a month or so, I get a flood of new and exciting ideas that I want to work on, but can't possibly come close to approaching them all. So, I just start entering everything into Things.app blindly. Then, when I'm done, I sort them all out into the nice categories and areas of responsibilities that I have, and my next month or two of inspired ideas is nicely organized. :)

Also, some of my best digital creations start away from the computer—on paper. Blog posts, talks for Python conferences, new Python library ideas. I sit down somewhere away from my machine with my favorite notebook and pen and start hashing out the idea. I can think much clearer without the ever-pressing distraction of a computer in front of me sometimes :)

Why did I create Requests? Well, it was originally a little file called requests.py inside a module that I was working on — an API wrapper for Convore, a hot new chat service that everyone was using at the time. Working the API client, with this submodule called requests.py that I wanted to be perfect, led me to create a seperate repository just for that. I was planning to make many API clients, so I wanted requests to be perfect, and do absolutely everything I'd ever want to with HTTP in Python without any bullshit (e.g. with a great API). And, that's what happened! Much to my surprise, Requests really resonated with people on a level that no other project I had created yet had.

In honor of Convore, and the big influence it had on me, I built an archive website this past year, so make the entire contents of the website browsable:

http://convore-archive.org