I am Brad Frost. Ask me anything.

I'm Brad Frost, a web designer, speaker, consultant, musician, and artist located in beautiful Pittsburgh, PA. I'm constantly tweeting, writing and speaking about the web and other topics. I've also helped create some tools and resources for web designers, including This Is Responsive, Pattern Lab, Styleguides.io, WTF Mobile Web, and Mobile Web Best Practices.

Ask Brad Frost about:

  • Responsive Web Design
  • Frontend Development
  • Public Speaking
  • Best Practices
  • Future Projects
  • Music
  • Art
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38 discussions

Hello, Brad! Thanks for doing this AMA.

Progressive Web Apps; everyone says they are the future? What is your opinion on them, if any? Also do you believe that the emergence of Progressive Web Apps would shrinking the revenue of mobile app stores; as we see a shift from native to PWA?

Hey Consuelo! Thanks so much for your question.

I haven't personally dug into building Progressive Web Apps, but I'll say I'm really excited about them. They build on the foundation of the web and technologies like service workers give the traditional web experience super powers that gets the web a lot closer to the native experiences people expect today.

The truth of the matter is that mobile app stores are already seeing shrinking numbers. Let's take a look:

  • The average number of apps people download per month is 0.
  • users spend 84% of their time in just five apps
  • 80% of apps never make it to 1,000 downloads
  • 84% of users that download an app will delete it after only one use

(via http://adage.com/article/digitalnext/app-downloads-future/306853/ and https://qz.com/253618/most-smartphone-users-download-zero-apps-per-month/)

It's not that native experiences are bad, it's just that it takes a lot of management and effort to download and maintain a ton of native apps. The web on the other hand is boundless and easily searchable. Today a web experience may not have the same stickiness as native apps, but that very well may change thanks to technologies like Progressive Web Apps. I'm a firm believer in the open web, so if we can build upon that foundation in order to give people better experiences, I'm all for it.

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Hey Brad! Did you noticed any changes in amounts of bullshit since your last "Death to bullshit" talks? Or just any updates on the subject :)

Yes and no!

On one hand, it's been really promising to see things like Google moving to penalize bullshit popups: http://searchengineland.com/interstitialgeddon-google-warns-will-crack-intrusive-interstitials-next-january-257252

On the other hand, there's been a flood of fake news that's warped our discourse and democracy. That's bullshit, and is a hell of a lot more critical than some obnoxious overlay. So clearly there's still a lot of work to be done.

In the meantime, what I've said on the site (http://deathtobullshit.com/) still holds true for me:

  • Respect people and their time.
  • Respect your craft.
  • Be sincere.
  • Create genuinely useful things.

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Have you built anything that is a culmination of your love for Web Design, Music, and Art? :)

Not yet! I have some really cool ideas for the website for my music project, so I'm hoping to get that off the ground soon!

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Hi Brad,Just wanted to know your opinion on Angular 4 and would that beat the complexities that are prevalent in the web world.Also Would like to your opinion on whether React is slowly taking over Angular?

Hey Manoj, Thanks for the question. I wish I was super knowledgeable about JavaScript frameworks like Angular and React, but I'm afraid I'm not.

Generally, I tend to build using principles like progressive enhancement rather than rendering my DOM in JavaScript, which is why I'm not on the up and up about those kinds of JS frameworks.

That said, I'm really excited to see more of these libraries move in the direction of being isomorphic (http://isomorphic.net/), meaning they can run on both the server side and client side. Tim Kadlec has a great article about how only rendering things on the client-side hinders performance https://timkadlec.com/2015/02/client-side-templatings-major-bug/ . So it's good to know frameworks are moving towards being isomorphic. From what I've heard of React, that seems to be a big reason people like using it.

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Do you believe Safari is a shitty browser?

WRT : Lea Verou's response in her AMA. https://hashnode.com/ama/with-lea-verou-cisurfxip04k5f953l6vd4qds#cisvlprbg08rrei530gob3lkj

Hahaha I can't disagree with Lea here. In my own work, I've been consistently surprised at how nicely my work looks and functions in Edge (and hell, even in IE 11). Safari on the other hand seems to have a lot of quirks or partially-supported stuff that ends up blocking things pretty dramatically. As Lea said, there's no getting around Safari on mobile, so those shortcomings are really highlighted as you test on mobile devices.

To add to Lea's grievances about Safari, it's extremely frustrating that Apple operates in such a black box. Every other browser manufacturer has extraordinary developer relations programs in place and do a fantastic job engaging with the community. Apple's culture is the exact opposite, which I think ends up being detrimental to the web's progress. I hope the competitive nature of the game forces them to rethink their approach.

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