Dev.to Or Hashnode?

dev.to

12%

Hashnode

88%

66 votes · Closed

Which one do you prefer and why?

Start a personal dev blog on your domain for free and grow your readership.

3.4K+ developers have started their personal blogs on Hashnode in the last one month.

Write in Markdown · Publish articles on custom domain · Gain readership on day zero · Automatic GitHub backup and more

Sandeep Panda's photo

Update: 15 June 2021

This comment is outdated. Hashnode changed its direction in June 2020 to focus solely on developer blogging. We did a few things correct that resonated very well with the developer community.

Here's a detailed comparison between Hashnode vs Dev.to.


This question gets asked once in a while, but I've never commented on this previously. So, here are my thoughts:

I don't use Devto, but I have seen the overall look and feel of it. Some think that we are in competition with them -- that's actually not true. DEV portrays itself as an open community for developers. They are open source and have probably accepted donations from users in the past. I am not sure how they plan on making money in the long term. However, we started Hashnode to build a profitable business and help developers get better in their career. Our initial goal was to create a conversational community. But we did a bit of a course correction over the last 3 months and now our modified goal is Empower developers to tell their stories and help them grow in their career. If you look at the home page, you will see the modified goal:

Screenshot 2019-05-19 at 10.22.21 AM.png

Now, here is what platforms like Devto, Medium and others lack -- it's the inability to tell your story while retaining independence. People publish content on the above websites because they need visibility. Creating and maintaining your own blog is time consuming. Not to mention the lack of audience. As a result people just give away their content to Medium and similar platforms. But what about independence? What happens if the said service goes out of business? What happens to your posts if the company puts them behind a paywall?

Just have a look at Medium's home page -- all the recommended stories are behind a paywall. The largest dev publication Hackernoon is now moving away from them. We realized that there has to be a better way for developers to tell their stories and that's the reason we are taking a different approach. We are shifting our focus to help developers share their stories freely under their own branding while still leveraging Hashnode's audience. The benefits are:

  • Your posts live on your own domain. Republish your content elsewhere for extra visibility. After all it's your content!
  • Not happy with Hashnode? Just export the posts and switch your provider. You still retain the SEO benefits.
  • We promise that we'll never put your posts behind a paywall.

We ran a small twitter campaign around this concept, and the result is amazing! We have unlocked personal blogs for 400 developers so far and the support is pouring in. I strongly believe this is the future of Hashnode and is going help us grow as a community.

TLDR; I believe your technical blog belongs to you! We are not in competition with Devto -- we just think that everyone should publish their content on their own domain first before republishing elsewhere.

Bonus

How do we make money if we give away everything for free? Our intentions are pretty clear -- we don't want to make money by showing ads or adding paywalls. We are an open community and we intend to keep it that way. We will soon start experimenting with "Team Blogs" and add several "Pro Features" for which developers/teams will need to pay a monthly subscription fee. However, the individual free plan (that you are on right now) is going to be free forever. It's just like GitHub's model -- private repos are free for individuals, but paid for the teams. However, this is just one of the ideas we are pursuing -- it may or may not work. But we will find a business model that helps us make money in the long term without relying on ads. We have raised $1M USD so far which gives us enough runway to experiment with various business models. ✌️

Show +1 replies
Yong Wei Lun's photo

we just think that everyone should publish their content on their own domain first before republishing elsewhere.

This is solid

Robert Nsinga's photo

Hi Sandeep, I have been an early enthusiast of your community features. I keep coming back once a year or so. Last year I opened a dev.to account simply because of its popularity. I wanted to feel for myself. I quickly closed my account once I realized the exact fundamental difference you alluded to here. Why then do I login once a year then, you may ask. Well, I feel like it's a bit cliche, but if I could have my personal blog look like the Hashnode user profile page or the homepage itself, Hashnode's differentiation would be complete (in my opinion). Until then, I will keep checking in once a year. I like what you have done with the UI/UX.

Bridget Sarah's photo

I think as developers we all want to find the right community at some point, I know for one that i was specifically hoping to find one that that lead me to Hashnode which I love.

I did register an account with Dev.to just to check it out but it the community site needs a complete overhaul, it's just in your eyes and really not user-friendly, which is a shame as theirs advanced content to see but it just gives me a headache looking at the site.

Hashnodes team is very dedicated to the look and feel of the site, it's user friendly, top of the market and they're on the ball with a lot of things :)

Tapas Adhikary's photo

Any blogging platform that encourages a blogger like me to write, share and learn.

I am very new to both. At this point Hashnode is ahead to me because, the blog writing experience is more friendlier. Also I liked the way Social Marketing has picked up for this platform. People who are behind the platform are also extremely motivated, responsive and helpful. That's mostly needed for an enthusiastic blogger as encouragement. Must to mention of the devblog platform I have been using now, that's awesome!

On the other hand, I find Dev.to is content rich may be because it is there for a while. However the connect, ease of operating as blogger etc. a miss so far.

I feel that, the growth of any of the blogging platform would help folks like me. Hence I would always move my head around multiple things(as a Habit).

P.S: All my post on Dev.to so far ends with an important footnote, This was originally posted on my Hashnode Blog 😊😊😊."

Show +2 replies
Sandeep Panda's photo

Thamaraiselvam Maybe summarize your findings, turn it into a blog post and publish the result on your blog? :) I'll put down my own thoughts as an answer to this question later today.

Jacob Cavazos (Jake)'s photo

I am on both and for some reason, I am enjoying this community more. Maybe UX including interactions with the platform developers as well as members.

Mark's photo

To call this "extreme sampling bias" would be an understatement. What do you expect to achieve with such a vote?

Thamaraiselvam's photo

I am going to do nothing with the result but I do not understand why dev.to is much more active than hashnode. I use both of them and Just wanted to know which community developers prefer and why.

Damian's photo

Good question. I'm new here, but I find hashnode to be much much more readable and simply better looking. It's to early to evaluate all the functionalities, but for the start, I prefer something that looks good, is easy to use and nice to read.

Sanjay Ojha's photo

I love both, my interception so far

-Dev.to is bigger community with lot of content. Hashnode is smaller.

-Dev.to websites load much faster.

-Hashnode UI is much better.

-Both community is friendlier, but Hashnode have an edge over Dev.to

-Both community provide informative article about modern development tools

-Both community has fewer post/discussion related to old development tools like C, Java, PHP etc

-Dev.to has more reaction and engagement on a article or post

-Writing article or asking question is much easier and friendlier on Hashnode

-Very less reply on questions related to coding problem in both community. Stackoverflow is better for this case

Kevin Pliester's photo

I just like it better here and it doesn't look so old-fashioned. Since there is now also the blog function, I find it even better. Use hashnode but only since today.

Krunal's photo

Both Dev.to and Hashnode are great. But, as of now, dev.to has more members and resources. I don't prefer one over another but dev.to is big right now.

dhanushka madushan's photo

Most interesting thing I have seen in Hashnode is that fantastic user experience. If you compared Hashnode and Dev.to, you can clearly see that you need to do huge struggle to create a blog post. Even adding a picture is multiple click process. Also some of the features are hidden and you need to reveal it by googling (Only if you know that there was such a feature). Also hashnode blog platform is cool place for blogger. Other than that, both platforms functionality look same for me.

Joseph S Stevens's photo

The community is friendlier!

Md Zaid Imam's photo

I shall put a table just to compare both the platform. 2 years back I joined this platform and so far I have seen some drastic change to this community.

Hashnode.png

Hashnode, team way to go.... All comparison is based on the current stage of the community and this is my assumption which could not be so accurate. #myviews #myfeeling

Eray Erdin's photo

Next hot question (while in Russia somewhere): Russia or US?

Tudor Danes's photo

Wait a sec...i thought this is the same as Dev.to..same UI...same topics ???

Yong Wei Lun's photo

What I like the most on Hashnode is Q&A. Meanwhile on dev.to, people have to write a post just to ask questions